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Fast Facts |

Floodplain harvesting is the capture and use of overland flow water flowing across a floodplain during a flood.  Farmers everywhere in NSW (north and south) capture over land flow water as part of their works approval requirements to store rainfall on farm to mitigate environmental impacts.  Farms are specifically designed for this purpose.
Farmers on floodplains have flood protection works designed to exclude overland flow outside of the developed area, to protect their crops, homes and farm infrastructure from damage.
Overland flows generally occur only when there is major flooding. If there’s no flooding, there’s no floodwater to capture. The localised flooding in the Namoi and Lower Gwydir Valleys (Mehi region) this last month has been the first event since 2011 and 2012 for these regions.

Fast Facts |

The Water Management Act 2000 in Section 4A describes overland flow as water including floodwater, rainfall runoff and urban stormwater that his flowing over or lying on the ground as a result of rain or any other kind of precipitation.  That means that anyone who has infrastructure developments to capture, manage and/or store water on their farms and who irrigate with this water, can also be collecting overland flow, not just those in the five northern valleys who are "floodplain harvesters".  This definition is regardless of any other requirements of other NSW regulations (such as the NSW EPA Act) and various licence conditions, to capture and retain water on farm to avoid environmental impacts. 

Fast Facts |

Unfortunately in NSW there are a few remaining long-term legacy issues, the fact water management is coordinated through two legislative frameworks is one of them.  That means that some approvals, rules and extraction is managed according to rules within the original NSW Water Act 1912 but the majority are within the contemporary regime of the NSW Water Management Act 2000. 
Government inaction has meant that the majority of irrigation infrastructure and flood work approvals are yet to be converted into the new legislative framework.  This has been an on-going issue for more than 20-years.  But this is important when considering the "legal status" of floodplain harvesting in NSW, which is one of the last forms of extraction to be converted from the descriptive allowances in the Water Act 1912 into volumetric licences in the Water Management Act 2000, which is due for completed next year.  Just because its not managed or represented within the Water Management Act, doesn't make it illegal, if its allowed under the Water Act 1912. 
This is why its important the Healthy Floodplains Project is completed on time next year, to bring this historical form of extraction into the same licensing framework as others and enable government to better regulate, measure and report on it.  Its proper implementation will cap extraction within historic limits, ensure the sustainability of the industry but also leaving more water on the floodplain.

Fast Facts |

The GVIA represents in excess of 450 water entitlement holders in the Gwydir Valley. The organisation works to represent the interests of our members and secure a viable future for our region through ensuring water rights are protected and water use by members, the environment and our river operators is efficient and sustainable.  We work together to build a better future for our region and make every drop count. 
Our role provides a voice for our industry and region to decision makers, our local community and the broader public. This can involve writing and commenting on policy proposals, inquiries and participating in meetings with key stakeholders including Ministers and Department staff.  We take seriously our role in improving grower research and innovation in our industry.

Fast Facts |

Irrigators in the Gwydir Valley have had zero allocation of general security or supplementary water this year. A small limited announcement was made last week.  Any irrigated annual crops being grown this season are grown on groundwater. No general security water was permitted to be delivered this year.  Permanent plantings are supported by high security water which was delivered via bulk releases and groundwater.

Fast Facts |

When water availability is higher than requirements for critical needs, the WMA Act 2000 and local water sharing rules provide a framework to share that additional water between industry and the environment.  Allocations are the physical water that maybe provided under these sharing rules. The volume of allocation made available to an individual  is determined by the total volume available to be shared. This volume is divided by the number of shares that individual is licenced for.  
Water is allocated based on these principles and is not allocated to a specific crop. Individuals make the decision on what crop to grow with the allocation they receive.
There is a range of different irrigated crops grown in the Gwydir Valley, including cotton, horticulture and lucerne. We are home to the largest pecan farm in the Southern Hemisphere and one of Australia's largest juicing orange orchards.   Farmers have even tried hemp, it is not currently a viable option, but may be in the future.

Fast Facts |

The Gwydir is characterised as having low water reliability, in the last 10-years irrigators have accessed only 19% of river inflows for General Security use and 8% for supplementary.  The majority of water held as general security water with a reliability of 36%. Supplementary water entitlement is somewhat more reliable with 55% but accounts for less than a quarter of the total volume.  There is around 40,000ML available as high security or groundwater entitlement which is considered highly reliable.
General Security water is stored in Copeton dam, derived from rainfall and river flow above the dam.
Supplementary water is unregulated flows downstream of the dam, it is only announced after environmental flows to the wetlands. After that all remaining flows are shared equally between the environment and licence holders (including environmental licence holders)

Fast Facts |

The GVIA supports the better management of environmental water provided that all water rights are equally respected.  Environmental water holders own 28.5% of High Security entitlements, 29% of General Security including the ECA and 13% of Supplementary.  We need to better share the outcomes being achieved on environmental water and ensure these outcomes are not undermined by ignoring non-flow complementary measures. Non-flow complementary measures include things such as fish passages at weirs or riparian management. 

Fast Facts |

The GVIA supports that all water take should be measured with the majority of take to be metered through highly accurate devices.  All measurement must be auditable, verifiable and within accuracy requirements.  We know active irrigators in our region adopt the most accurate technology commercially available.

News |

The GVIA are disappointed with recent media reports and commentary around the management of floodplain flows and have provided the following statement and facts about the program, which was designed to incorporate this legitimate historical access into the current regulatory framework as required by legislation.    We want people to know that this is not new water and that implementing this program will have many benefits.  Most importantly it will protect the environment and users from further growth, providing certainty to all communities who rely on it. Restricting future growth will maintain and improve floodplain flows and build on Basin Plan outcomes, not detract from them.

Fast Facts |

Water for irrigation is limited and the volume has been decreasing over-time due to government reforms.  WaterNSW information indicates 66% of all river flows are reserved for the environment and another 5% is actively managed by environmental water holders who have approximately 29% of regulated general security river entitlement and another 28.5% of high security entitlement has been either purchased or diverted from irrigators in the Gwydir Valley for the environment.  A further 13% of supplementary entitlement has been purchased, this is on top of the 50% share already received during each unregulated event. Unregulated events occur when there are inflows into the river below the dam. 

Making Every Drop Count

Securing a future for the Gwydir Valley through Irrigated Agriculture.